Home  Rave Archive  Recreational Drugs Wormwood

Basket:
Qty:
Total:  
   

 


 


Wormwood

Artemisia absinthium is a species of wormwood, native to temperate regions of Eurasia and northern Africa.

It is a herbaceous perennial plant, with a hard, woody rhizome. It grows naturally on uncultivated, arid ground, on rocky slopes, and at the edge of footpaths and fields.

The plant can easily be cultivated in dry soil. They should be planted under bright exposure in fertile, mid-weight soil. It prefers soil rich in nitrogen. It is an ingredient in the liquor absinthe.

Absinthe is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45%74% ABV) beverage. It is an anise-flavored spirit derived from herbs, including the flowers and leaves of the herb Artemisia absinthium, commonly referred to as "grande wormwood". Absinthe traditionally has a natural green color but can also be colorless.

Absinthe is unusual among spirits in that it is bottled at a very high proof but is normally diluted with water when consumed. Absinthe originated in Switzerland. It achieved great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Absinthe has been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug. The chemical thujone, present in small quantities, was singled out and blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in most European countries except the United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain, Portugal, Denmark and the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

In the 1970s, a scientific paper mistakenly reported thujone was related to THC, the active chemical in cannabis. Ten years after his 19th century experiments with wormwood oil, Magnan studied 250 cases of alcoholism and claimed that those who drank absinthe were worse off than those drinking ordinary alcohol, and that they experienced rapid-onset hallucinations.

Two famous painters who helped popularize the notion that absinthe had powerful psychoactive properties were Toulouse Lautrec and Vincent van Gogh. In one of the best known accounts of absinthe drinking, Oscar Wilde described the feeling of having tulips on his legs after leaving a bar. Today it is known that absinthe does not cause hallucinations. Thujone, the active chemical in absinthe can produce muscle spasms in large doses, there is no evidence that it causes hallucinations. It has been speculated that reports of hallucinogenic effects of absinthe may have been due to poisonous chemicals being added to cheaper versions of the drink in the 19th century, to give it a more vivid color.

However, the debate over whether absinthe produces effects on the human mind additional to those of alcohol has not been conclusively resolved. The effects of absinthe have been described by some as mind opening. The most commonly reported experience is a "clear-headed" feeling of inebriation a form of "lucid drunkenness". Chemist, historian and absinthe distiller Ted Breaux has claimed that the alleged secondary effects of absinthe may be caused by the fact that some of the herbal compounds in the drink act as stimulants, while others act as sedatives, creating an overall lucid effect of awakening. Long term effects of low absinthe consumption in humans remain unknown, although the herbs in absinthe have both painkilling and antiparasitic properties.


 
Play Drugs
Trumps & make
learning fun
Street Clothing
Designs with
drug slogans
Dope Head Clothing
Design your own drug
based t-shirts
Recreational
Drugs Blog/Chat
Recreational Drugs
Forum / Discussions
 

**Disclaimer / Useful information**

Whilst we endeavour to check the information contained in these pages we do not guarantee the accuracy of any of the information contained here in, nor do we condone the taking of illegal drugs.  Please do make further research where necessary on other internet sites.  We have a page of useful links.  View now
 

Receive Fantazia Emails
Get insider tips, offers  & event news. Includes our "Top Ten Best Rave..." series of emails



Return to top
 

Home  | Rave Archive | About us | Press & PR | Links | News | Gallery | Albums | Events | View Basket
Guestbook | Flyer Library | Clubwear | Advertise | Buy Dance Music
Fantazia | Contact us | Social Media  | Email: sales@fantazia.org.uk
We accept credit and debit card payments